The Behavioral Health Foundation and Nashville Organized for Action and Hope (NOAH) proudly present “A Community Response to Mental Health Crisis: From CAHOOTS to Nashville HEALS.” Please join us Thursday, February 3rd, at 6:30 p.m. (CT) for this free educational webinar.

Across the country, community leaders are recognizing that civilian-led crisis response teams are well-suited to safely and effectively help people experiencing behavioral health crises. Community responder programs improve health outcomes, reduce unnecessary arrests, and save lives.

CAHOOTS in Eugene, Oregon, is a nationally recognized community responder program where mental health crisis workers and medics respond to 911 calls instead of law enforcement. CAHOOTS teams intervene and make referrals to health and social services without the uniforms, sirens, and handcuffs that can increase distress for people in crisis.

The Behavioral Health Foundation, in collaboration with NOAH, developed “Nashville HEALS,” based on the CAHOOTS model. This webinar will be moderated by David Plazas, Tennessean Opinion and Engagement Director, and will feature:

To register, please click here.

View our one-page overview vision for Nashville HEALS:

One-page flyer overviewing Nashville HEALS, a community responder program envisioned for Nashville, TN

This event is presented at no charge courtesy of the Behavioral Health Foundation and NOAH. Please reach out if you are interested in partnering for future learning opportunities or otherwise supporting our work: info@behavioralhealthfoundation.org.

Moving Mental
Health Forward

A data-driven nonprofit policy center

Our Focus Areas

  • Mental Health
  • Addiction & Overdose
  • Criminal Justice
  • Children & Teens
  • Workforce
  • Social Determinants

Let's Start a Relationship

If you have a question, idea, or project in mind, we would love to talk with you.

Graphic of people analyzing a graph

NASHVILLE – On the first day of November 2021, Commissioner Marie Williams from the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) and Director Stephen Smith from the Bureau of TennCare presented budget proposals for Fiscal Year 2022-2023 to Governor Bill Lee and team at the State Capitol. Across both budget proposals (scroll down for the links), the clear winner was the mental health and well-being of Tennesseans with more than $110 million in new funding proposed related to behavioral health needs.

DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH & SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES INCREASES

With a backdrop of skyrocketing overdose deaths (45% increase in TN from 2019-2020) and a three to four-fold increase in clinical levels of anxiety and/or depression amidst COVID-19 pandemic, Commissioner Williams, Deputy Commissioner Matt Yancey, and other departmental leaders announced a historic budget proposal that includes $106,729,900 in cost increases for behavioral health care and prevention in Tennessee, with the majority of this funding recurring. Of note, 100% of the proposed increases are to be funded by State dollars.

With nearly $107 million in cost increases, including $65 million in recurring funds, Commissioner Williams proposed budget for FY2022-23 includes $100 million more dollars compared to what was proposed last year. This is a very positive and significant investment proposed for behavioral health services. While not yet approved, TDMHSAS’ blueprint for the coming year is starting to emerge.

Take a look at the proposed TDMHSAS cost increases for FY2022-23 (funds are recurring unless noted otherwise):

In total, TDMHAS has proposed $64,709,900 in new recurring costs and another $42,020,000 in non-recurring costs.

Workforce Development

Much of this investment relates to behavioral health workforce development, a huge need that has been trumpeted by providers and advocates across the state for many years and is a priority for the Behavioral Health Foundation. In 2019 the Tennessee Association of Mental Health Organizations (TAMHO) published and distributed a call for an urgent investment of State funding to alleviate workforce shortages, a document which was authored by Elliot Pinsly, now the CEO of the Behavioral Health Foundation. In spring 2021, workforce development was noted as a key need across most of the seven planning regions for TDMHSAS across the state, and related legislative proposals were submitted by planning council Regions II and IV in May 2021. Meanwhile, Commissioner Williams announced around that same time that TDMHAS and TennCare were launching a new collaborative workgroup to examine behavioral health workforce issues in the state with the goal of identifying solutions for consideration in the FY2022-23 budgeting process. While the final report from that workgroup remains pending, we now know a lot more about the State’s path forward.

To support Tennessee’s public behavioral health workforce, Commissioner Williams has proposed $36 million for a 20% provider rate increase, based on a 2% increase over each of the previous 10 years. Another $10 million has been proposed for clinician sign-on bonuses ($4 million), a scholarship program ($5 million), and a new internship portal ($1 million). These programs for mental health care professionals, which are similar to existing incentives in place that apply to physical health care, are needed more than ever as demand for behavioral health care has spiked amidst ongoing workforce shortages.

Addiction & Overdose

In response to demand for addiction treatment and record overdose deaths in Tennessee, Commissioner Williams has proposed $33.5 million for various substance use related programming. This includes $6 million for clinical treatment to serve an estimated 2,460 Tennesseans, $1 million for expanded wraparound services to serve an estimate 1,798 Tennesseans, and $26.5 million in non-recurring funding for four residential addiction treatment facilities (adding 200-300 residential beds).

Creating Jobs Initiative

We are also excited to see the inclusion of $900,000 for the Creating Jobs Initiative, which will help expand much-needed supported employment services to Tennesseans with mental health needs. Maintaining a job is a highly influential factor in recovery, and TDMHSAS and partners have done a tremendous job over the past several years in delivering an expanding Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.

Crisis and Decriminalization

And we are not done yet, with another hugely needed cost increase proposed aimed at the decriminalization of mental health and access to care: $26 million has been proposed to boost the state’s Crisis Continuum. This funding will support, “3 New Crisis Walk-In Centers/Crisis Stabilization Units, operational funding, and emergency department-based mental health professionals to meet mental health crisis needs and reduce burden on hospitals and law enforcement.” Missing is $15 million in one-time funding requested by the Tennessee Diversion Coalition for statewide co-response, community responder, and substance use deflection grants, though other funding opportunities may be available to support the launch and expansion of these law enforcement deflection services. Making sure the “deflect to what” is taken care of is critically important, and TDMHSAS is doing that by investing in the Crisis Continuum.

Peer Support Again Facing Reductions

Again on the chopping block are Peer Support Centers, which primarily serve vulnerable Tennesseans with serious mental health issues. Commissioner Williams has proposed $946,900 in reductions from these centers in FY2022-23, after proposing more than $1.5 million in reductions to those same centers the previous year (no reductions ultimately were made). Research continues to show the value of peer support in the continuum of services offered to individuals with mental health issues, and any reductions to peer support funding in Tennessee would be a step in the wrong direction. This was the only item suggested for a reduction in the coming year.

TENNCARE JOINS IN INCREASING MENTAL HEALTH COSTS

Following the TDMHSAS budget hearing was TennCare’s turn, and the good news for mental health in Tennessee continued. Among the proposed TennCare cost increases proposed, Director Stephen Smith included $11 million ($7 million recurring) for the “Mental Health Delivery System.” While details right now are slim, Director Smith and team indicated that the $11 million is aimed at boosting community mental health centers with a focus on treatment services. At the same time, $5 million in cost reductions have been proposed for clinical mental health treatment related to TN Health Link care coordination and one other program that was not specified. So this $11 million cost increase line item is ultimately a $6 million net increase and would be a win for Tennessee.

TennCare Director Smith
TennCare Director Stephen Smith

A STRONG STEP FORWARD FOR TENNESSEE

While there is work left to do to ensure these funds are approved in the FY2022-23 budget, both TDMHSAS and TennCare have signaled clearly that investing State funds into the behavioral health system is a top priority. Especially in regard to the workforce development proposal from TDMHSAS, it’s worth celebrating that such serious investments have been proposed to help make sure Tennesseans can access care when and where they need it. The continued advocacy work among many of our partners is starting to pay off, and we appreciate the efforts of TDMHAS, TennCare, and members of the behavioral health workforce workgroup that met over the summer to develop a plan to right the workforce ship. Today is a good day for mental health in Tennessee.

Governor Lee
Governor Bill Lee

Missed the budget hearings? Recordings are available here:

https://sts.streamingvideo.tn.gov/Mediasite/Channel/mediasiteadmin-tn-budget-hearingsfy2022-2023

To view TDMHSAS’ budget proposal slides:

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/finance/documents/2021-budget-hearings/Mental%20HealthSASMonday.pdf

To view TennCare’s budget proposal slides:

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/finance/documents/2021-budget-hearings/TennCareMonday.pdf

UPDATE 11/2/21: A previous version of this story noted the total proposed cost increases as $163 million across TennCare and TDMHSAS, but we have since been informed that TennCare’s $50 million investment in workforce development is NOT intended for the mental health workforce as seemed to originally be implied during the budget hearing. Details from TennCare remain scarce.

Moving Mental
Health Forward

A data-driven nonprofit policy center

Our Focus Areas

  • Mental Health
  • Addiction & Overdose
  • Criminal Justice
  • Children & Teens
  • Workforce
  • Social Determinants

Let's Start a Relationship

If you have a question, idea, or project in mind, we would love to talk with you.

Graphic of people analyzing a graph

The Behavioral Health Foundation proudly presents: Moving from Diversion to Deflection to Co-Responder and Beyond. Learn from leading international and regional experts about the exciting field of deflection and pre-arrest diversion. Please join us Thursday, June 24, at 10:00 a.m. (CT) for a one-hour presentation followed by an interactive Q&A, featuring worldwide-renowned speaker Jac Charlier (PTACC & TASC CHJ), special guest Judge Dan Eisenstein (TN Diversion Coalition), and host Elliot Pinsly (Behavioral Health Foundation).

Jac Charlier is Executive Director for the Police, Treatment, and Community Collaborative (PTACC) and the TASC Center for Health and Justice (CHJ) in Chicago, IL. He is a Master Global Trainer in Alternatives to Incarceration with the U.S. Dept. of State (INL) and an internationally recognized leader in the developing field of pre-arrest deflection.

Judge Dan Eisenstein is Chair for the TN Diversion Coalition, a diverse alliance dedicated to the expansion of pre-arrest deflection and diversion programming. He is a retired General Sessions Court Judge in Nashville, TN.

Elliot Pinsly is President & CEO of the Behavioral Health Foundation, a data-driven, nonprofit policy center in TN that advances mental health, addiction care, and related criminal justice reform. He is Co-Chair for the TN Diversion Coalition and also Co-Chair for PTACC’s International Deflection & Diversion Strategy Area.

This live event is limited to the first 100 registrations. A recording will also be made available on behavioralhealthfoundation.org following the event.

To register, please click here.

This event is presented at no charge courtesy of the Behavioral Health Foundation. Please reach out if you are interested in partnering for future learning opportunities or otherwise supporting our work: info@behavioralhealthfoundation.org.

Moving Mental
Health Forward

A data-driven nonprofit policy center

Our Focus Areas

  • Mental Health
  • Addiction & Overdose
  • Criminal Justice
  • Children & Teens
  • Workforce
  • Social Determinants

Let's Start a Relationship

If you have a question, idea, or project in mind, we would love to talk with you.

Graphic of people analyzing a graph

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Mental Health America (MHA) has announced the 2021 recipients of the national organization’s annual awards, and Tennessee nonprofits are taking home some impressive hardware.

Mental Health America of the MidSouth, based in Nashville, is bringing home MHA’s 2021 Betty Humphrey Equity Champion Award, created in honor of Dr. Betty Humphrey, a tireless advocate for culturally competent mental health care. The award is given to an individual or organization for demonstrating an ongoing commitment to the fight for diversity, equity, and inclusion, recognizing those who advance the intersectionality of mental health as it relates to discrimination, poverty, stigma, racism, and overall social and economic determinants of health.

Mental Health America Award

For more than 20 years, Mental Health America of the MidSouth has offered the Multicultural Outreach Program (MOP), which started by providing mental health education and programs in Spanish and expanded to offer mental health supports in Somali, Kurdish, and other languages. Today, this remains one of the only programs in the southern U.S. that provides regular mental health programs for non-English speakers, having developed two new curricula: one to train interpreters and another to teach mental health providers to work with interpreters, both aimed at improving culturally competent care. The local organization’s MOP program most recently has grown, adding programs to help foreign-born nationals recover from human trafficking, to assist in case management for unaccompanied minors, and to host a monthly gathering of Nashville leaders in order to promote culturally responsive mental health services throughout Middle Tennessee.

“MHA of the MidSouth is honored to be recognized among our peers for our work in multicultural outreach,” said Tom Starling, Ed.D., President and CEO at Mental Health America of the MidSouth. “Providing resources for these vulnerable individuals is key to our mission and to reducing stigmas and cultural barriers.”

The Behavioral Health Foundation, a data-driven nonprofit policy center also based in Nashville, is the other local nonprofit accepting a major national MHA award this year. Elliot Pinsly, Behavioral Health Foundation President & CEO, will be accepting MHA’s 2021 George Goodman Brudney and Ruth P. Brudney Social Work Award, which recognizes significant contributions made to improve the care and treatment of people with lived mental health experience by practicing professionals in the field of social work.

Elliot Pinsly, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and native Nashvillian, is a passionate leader in mental health policy and strategic advocacy who has helped to develop innovative and effective behavioral health programs serving countless Tennesseans. Elliot has been instrumental in the expansion of crisis walk-in centers, pre-arrest diversion and deflection programming, emergency mental health transportation reform, insurance parity enforcement, and mental health awareness. Working hand-in-hand with fellow social workers, behavioral health providers, judges, advocacy organizations, law enforcement, hospitals, legislators, government officials, and concerned citizens, Elliot Pinsly and the Behavioral Health Foundation continue helping to create meaningful changes to systems and policies that improve the lives of individuals with lived mental health experience.

“Thank you so much to Mental Health America for this incredible honor,” said Elliot Pinsly, President & CEO at the Behavioral Health Foundation. “The profession of social work requires that we not only do the work in front of us but also go above and beyond to advocate for social justice and systems change. We must continue working together, across all professions, to ensure everyone has access to high quality care whenever and wherever they may need it.”

All awards will be distributed during MHA’s Annual Conference, titled “Resiliency to Recovery,” taking place June 10-12 in Washington, DC. 

Moving Mental
Health Forward

A data-driven nonprofit policy center

Our Focus Areas

  • Mental Health
  • Addiction & Overdose
  • Criminal Justice
  • Children & Teens
  • Workforce
  • Social Determinants

Let's Start a Relationship

If you have a question, idea, or project in mind, we would love to talk with you.

Graphic of people analyzing a graph